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on the battlefield. and they are held under the law of war because we don't want to let them go back to killing us, and they are not given a lawyer because we're not trying to solve a crime, we're trying to win a war. and here's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were put in military custody because we were all afraid and they looked like the enemy. that was not a high point in america. what are we talking about here? we're talking about detaining people under the law of war who are suspected of joining al qaeda of the taliban in engaging in a belligerent act against the united states. now, i want to make the record clear that some of my colleagues on the republican side have been trying to deny law of war detention to the obama administration, and they have openly said this. if you allow t
security is imperative to the success of today's military. which, by the way, uses 93% of the energy that's used by the federal government, which is the largest user of energy in this country. as our current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general dempsey, has said, without improving our energy security we are not merely standing still as a nation, we are falling behind. let's be clear. energy security is national security. and our military leadership understands this. other countries, including some of our strongest competitors, also understand this and we ignore this fact at our own peril. i saw some of the innovations that the navy has adopted earlier this year when i chaired a hearing for the energy subcommittee on water and power down in norfolk aboard the uss kersarge. the purpose was to highlight the advancements the navy continues to make in harnessing renewable energy resources. up with of those resources i saw is homegrown -- homegrown biofuels. and the navy recently demonstrated the capability of advanced biofuels during massive exercise that featured a carrier strike gr
effectively? he's so passionate about real data and real legal principles and be found as judge walker told us and chat and i refer to that decision, that if we have real data, we will always counter our foes who are trying to throw bias at the sabrett is passionate about that and that is loud be institute to be so successful in what it's done. he has the talent for tracking leading scholars from all over the country in an incredibly successful way so that over the years we have watched brad with his organizational chart and he filled in all the slots and we arrived at where we are today. so i thank you very much for the contribution he has made for us and i will turn it over to him to introduce the panel. >> thanks so much, tom. [applause] i want to start out by thanking tom. we were here at the very beginning like he said in this very room and his step with us along the way and that's really important to work here and around the country. i also want to thank matt and -- for putting together this great panel and doing all the work that gets all of us here in his room for this great commerce s
started. this is live coverage running just a few minutes late. again, a reminder you can follow us on facebook and facebook.com/booktv and we have exclusive updates and author interviews, et cetera on her facebook page. just waiting for mr. patterson. this should be to shortly ensure that coverage of the miami book fair international 29th year. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon. please take your seats. we are about to begin the session. thank you so much. i am marilou harrison and many of you have heard from me because he been in this room yesterday and today. i served as a volunteer here, a very proud: tiered of miami book fair international candidate to recognize is that done before, all of the volunteers come to thousands of volunteers for miami dade college as well as the community who come together reach you to think this book fair take place. i'd also like to recognize those who are fri
in tucson has helped inform us of who we are. i got that phonecall and i couldn't believe it. almost a year ago in january, phonecall from a teacher who said jeff, they have come into our rooms and confiscated our books. in tucson, the same school district that i was a product in the first years of my life. they had gone into this room and taken out seven textbooks, like rethinking columbus a book that is sold hundreds of thousands of copied, used by kids in rural alaska all the way to rural maine who have that -- and that book was put away into storage. and 11 teachers, almost a dozen teachers were told that they no longer have the right to teach literature from the perspective of mexican-americans, those who have given us our school district from the perspective of rethinking columbus. .. i have to begin, and i will tell you something about our stories. i went to find my story. i had been living outside of tucson for years, and i wanted to come back, working on another book, and deeply ameshed, of course, in other struggles and conflicts as the journalist in the coal fields around the wor
together, you know, are going to bankrupt us in the future. and, you know, medicare, it's all health care. if we don't solve that problem, we've got a problem whether it's the government spending or private spending. so we've got health care cost inflation as the number one problem. the aging is really not that big of a problem. with social security we saved money in the trust fund to get us past most of the peak boomer retirement years. life expectancy growth is so moderate as a factor compared to other things that once the baby boomers retire, costs as a share of g, the p -- gdp level off. there is a little growth in life expectancy, but it's very minor. if there's a demographic problem, it's the dropoff in births, not, you know, in population growth which has to do with immigration and the birthrate and not with life expectancy. and for the record, i'm in favor of gradually increasing the payroll tax to offset increases in life expectancy because it would be so slow and so modest that it wouldn't be much of a tax increase, and it would sort of shut people up altogether. but usually, of
of your affection. [applause] >> thank you. i was interested in architecture. i used to look at the cathedral's because of how beautiful they are and how serene, the but i very quickly became interested in how they were built. when you look at one of those european cathedrals you do think how did people get those enormous homes? beauvis had no power tools, know mathematics for constructing cranes and so on, and so i became interested in how it was done and eventually became interested in the society that produced the great cathedrals and the question that strikes anybody is why are they there so i became fascinated by that and quite early on in my career when i was still struggling to make it as a writer i had a go at writing a novel about building a cathedral. i felt jerry convinced it was a great popular novel to be written in the cathedral in about 1976, i wrote a few chapters on an outline and i sent them to my agent. he didn't like it at all and he was right and he said you are writing a tapestry and what you need is a series of linked melodrama. the truth of the matter
that makes us distinct from the united states. whereas in canada, the united states, you say go west to find your identity. in this country, it has always been go north. that is the part of the country that defines our identity and has so much promise in terms of its abundant resources. i do want to say this -- one of the things we tried to do as a government, with some success, is we come to office with two views but too often in the past, we're seeing. one is that this government is extremely pro-american. the valiant the relationship with the united states. we could not be in a better situation than to have the united states as our only real labor, closest economic partner and oldham of the allied. -- and ally. at the same time, we're strong canadian nationalists and think in our own modest way.we see no incompatibility with that. but we attrited did -- what we tried to do is say there is no need for canadianism to have anti-americanism. because of what does happen in the global economy. let's marry those two things. recognize the states powerful country that should not be a basis of rese
of other conservative causes and issues he was very involved with the. doing so gives us a history of what strom thurmond's america looks like and helps us rethink what was going on in the south and what was going on in the national conservative political realm as well. rethinking strom thurmond helps us rethink the history of modern conservatism. too often strom thurmond is left out because we only remember him as a cartoonish racist figure from the deep south. >> you can watch this on line at booktv.org. not all of their neil gaiman delivers the mason award lecture and dancers -- the mason awards presented honors authors make extraordinary contributions to bring in literature to wide reading public. this event was held at george mason university in virginia where the events are held. is an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> better than the guy who brought the correct sign out. >> thank you very much. what a lively audience. wish i could stay longer. my name is phil miller and i direct the books program festival and graduate writing program at george mason. [applause] >> i was going to sa
with this concept ofd i doing in black and white in a two and a quarter format without strobe lights, using only available or natural light. and we tried it out first witht gary hart. we went out to -- i believe it s was cleveland early on in february of 1987 and i had the first assignment out there.wa i came back and showed them the photographs and they were veryhe pleased with them. so i went on from there doing all the candidates. c-span: here's the front covernl of your book and you can seecant here this title "choose me." first let me ask you why you used that? what the...oo >> guest: it was interesting.se it was almost a photographas became the title came after theo photograph.alst once we had that photograph thia was much later on i decided that would be the cover of the book. d that that would be the cover of the book. and then i was almost thinking of a title to go with the photograph, and it seemed to fit the bill. >> how come there's a photograph on the cover? how come this one? >> well, once again, it was the beginner. the winner went on the cover. whoever won the election, became th
individually, much more, some of them at least, much more concerned with what's going on in vietnam. >> use all the change take place before your eyes. let me ask you this question. even though you saw the change taking place, when did you start thinking of the 60's as history? >> probably not until sometime in the 90's, the 80s or 90s. i'm pretty sure it wasn't until the 80's for instance a significant portion of my course syllabus which is 20th century history included a significant ratings on the 1960's. so maybe that is one answer to your question but of course a lot of people have been talking about the 60's even during the 60's. >> host: i've always been focused on books by one year. sometimes the historians like to talk about change across the time. that's pretty much what we like to do, and we like to talk about large swaths of time quite often in the decades. we even have this decade thing. but we rarely do a year, so there is a way that there is this close-up on the world on american society of a given moment in 1965. and is there a way that you can give a sense of how to unfold? in o
of equity and want to use it, the system should make judgments about how much to let them use. the system should allow flexibility and economic capacity and should invite all film is to think of homeownership and prepare for it. but shoko is that when i read this. what was driving a was more and more debt, more and more leverage. that was the only thing cne and freddie were interested in. their business as mortgages, said they wanted more of them. the bigger house, a lower down payment, higher mortgage. whatever it was infallibly to increase their profit potential because that's the system to make a private public system was devised. >> great comic thank you. we are delighted to have had the chance to discuss this outstanding book. thank you for all your questions. there will be more chance for questions and formally. there is a reception outside. hope he'll have the book and have bob autograph it. thank you very much and thanks to you and to our commentators. [applause] >> coming up, booktv presents "after words," the program were made by guest hosts to interview authors. this week, jame
that part. what makes the title useful is what happens with the civil-rights movement of american foreign policy. >> host: that the destruction is as a result of what it lbj did i a admire how you unfold the story. but it is important to understand make it clear to the degree that 1965 had johnson handled the war differently that maybe things would have been different. talk about that. >> it is not as awful as it now. try to find out what is there a point* where this could be avoided? 1965 was the time they bit the bullet several times and by this summer so heavily involved in in the combat that there was no getting out of it. this is the tragic thing about it coming he knew when he escalated the war united states and south vietnam would win or defeat it or invade north vietnam but that is the most they could help four. it was 1965. the nine states has 23,000 troops called military risers. this is about 6,000 more so in the space of a year he increased from 23,000. this was a considerable percentage increase but not a lot of people. the only combat that occurred was the gulf of tonkin cri
, and there is a way you can give us a sense of how this unfolds? in other words, how do you get to 1965? so we can better understand the terms of the conversation. how much change took place in 1965. >> guest: first, it's interesting how many books there are on individual years of the '60s, and i mention some of these in my preface. a lot of people are going to say, someone else said 1968. 1968 was a huge year. the tet offensive, johnson resigning, not going for another term. nixon's election, the assassination of martin luther king and bobby kennedy. the democratic party's wild convention in chicago. so, a lot of books on '68, a lot of '69, woodstock and altamont and that sort of thing. so, i'm afraid my book is by no means unique. there's also a very good book on 1964, which makes pretty much the same argument as i do, only he sets it a year earlier. i don't have any huge quarrel with that. i wouldn't say, look it, i'm the only person that's right about this. but '65 did seem to be the time, not the most dramatic. '68 probably was in terms of world-shattering memorable events. but it was a tame
if they choose and talk to us about it, and if they so choose to object. we hope that won't happen, obviously. we have worked very hard with colleagues, but nonetheless, that's the procedure that we're planning on following, and i would now call up a list of nine amendments which have been cleared, as i indicated before, mccain amendment number 3052, whitehouse amendment numbered 3075, snowe amendment numbered 3133, sanders amendment numbered 3182, sanders amendment numbered 3183, warner amendment numbered 3233, coburn amendment numbered 3236, sanders amendment numbered 3248, and rubio amendment numbered 3283. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. the amendments will be considered en bloc. is there further debate on the amendments? if not, all in favor say aye. all opposed, no. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes have it. the ayes are -- the amendments are agreed to en bloc. mr. levin: i move to reconsider. mr. mccain: lay on the table. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. levin: mr. president, there is going to be another hour in here where people have an opport
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15